Webinars
Go Learn


Lunch and Learn

Come Learn With Us - Online!

Join Go Learn for a series of informal, yet informative conversations with trip leaders past and present. Our second session begins Thursday, September 17. Each week will feature a presentation by a trip leader on a topic from their area of expertise followed by a Q&A session.

During this mostly-online climate we currently find ourselves in, travel vicariously with us through the stories and places that make a Go Learn trip unique. Our tour leaders will immerse you in the experiences of places we'll soon visit!

Replay our webinars from the first season HERE.
Find the second season HERE.


Upcoming Speaker Series Webinars

  • Marcella Kirschbaum and Christoph Dressler - A Tale of Two East German Families
    Th, November 5 - Register Here

    Two U of U colleagues meet for the first time, thousands of miles from their homelands. Within minutes they discover shared memories of gray toilet paper, the Berlin Wall, Trabants, and a sense of community.

  • Dr. David Derezotes - Opportunities for individual and collective transformation in our current convergence of pandemic, protests, and politics.
    Th, November 12 - Register Here

    Our current individual and collective suffering is real and it is as hard as it feels to deal with this convergence of such challenges as a pandemic, climate change, polarization, and racial tension. Such challenges are also opportunities for each of us to reflect on the only things we can change, our own attitudes and behaviors. In this short one hour program, participants will have the opportunity to reflect on their own attitudes and behaviors that intersect with the great challenges that face humanity today. Hopefully, by the end of this hour of largely experiential learning through dialogue and reflection, each of which will leave with an awareness of at least one area of our life that we are motivated to work more deeply on.

  • Katharine Coles, College of Humanities, Department of English - The Stranger I Become: essays in reckless poetics
    Th, November 19 - Register Here

    Katharine Coles will read and answer questions on essays from her forthcoming collection, The Stranger I Become: essays in reckless poetics. The goal of the essays is to represent poetic process (in reading, in writing, in thinking) as active within the context of an ordinary life lived in and through poetry, which becomes a kind of perceptual lens through which she experiences the world, as well as the vehicle through which she processes her experiences. Populated not only with poems but also with friends, relatives, and various creatures wild and domestic, the essays move through Coles’ house and yard, her neighborhood, and through other cities domestic and foreign, which, alongside the poems that inhabit her, make up the fabric of her experience.

  • Sylvia Torti, Dean, Honors College and Franz Goller, Professor, School of Biological Science - Traveling down memory lane – what birds and humans do or don‘t say
    Th, November 24- Register Here

    There are approximately 10,000 species of birds on earth, and the majority of them are songbirds who sing melodic, species-specific songs learned from their fathers. There is the age-old question: Why do birds sing? Of equal importance, is how do birds learn to sing? In her novel, and in this talk, Sylvia Torti—herself a biologist—explores the world of a birdsong laboratory and discusses what birdsong has taught us about human language and memory. Dr. Torti will talk about her novel, birdsong research, the craft of novel writing, as well as the dynamics between science and art and objective and subjective truths

  • Rick Paine, Associate Professor, Anthropology Department - Teotihuacan
    Th, December 3 - Register Here

    Teotihuacan was the Americas’ first true city. For almost 500 years, beginning about 100 C.E., Teotihuacan was one of the largest, most diverse cities in the world. It produced magnificent art and architecture, and dominated both the economy and the politics of Mesoamerica. In about 550 C.E. it all came crashing down. Rick will explore the rise and fall of this amazing city, along with its art and culture.


Replay our Webinars!

Elizabeth Archuleta, Associate Chair, Division of Ethnic Studies - New Mexico

Jonathan Duncan - The Spirit of High Places

Dean McGovern - Community Engagement: If not us, then who?

Ginger Smoak—Honors College - "Bring Out Your Dead": The Black Death and the Effects of Pandemics

Shundana Yusaf, Associate Professor, History and Theory, School of Architecture - Women Builders in Camel Cultures

Tim Slover and Jane England, Dept. of Theater, College of Fine Arts - How Will of Stratford Became Shakespeare

Hōkūlani K. Aikau - The Detours Project: Curating a decolonial guide to Hawaiʻi

All journeys have secret destinations of which the traveler is unaware.

—Martin Buber